zeldathemes
Thunderstruck!
Hey I'm Madi, you can just call me M! Here is my blog filled with fandoms, music, and personal fails. Live long and Prosper. Cheers.


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heidyiam:

Profiles 

Clone Club+Eskimopie

smaugnussen:

and I would walk 500 dogs and I would walk 500 more

toxicwinner:

aliens: land on earth
us: gives them a brief overview
aliens: my mama says i gotta come home right now immediately 

sailingonsuccess:

Hey haha maybe private conversations are private for a reason idk man haha

mymodernmet:

Banye, an adorable 11-year-old British Shorthair who lives in Shanghai with his owner winnnie,  looks perpetually surprised thanks to a patch of dark fur strategically grown beneath his mouth.

onlylolgifs:

Man gets a hard-on at the worst possible moment

"You’ll see a hundred castles," he promised her.

bakerstreetbabes:

lyndsayfaye:

What would Effie Munro’s daughter Lucy from Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s “The Adventure of the Yellow Face” have looked like in adulthood?  And what would have happened to her?

The hard truth is that very few options existed in the 19th century for women of color, and almost none as regarded what we would today call a “career.”  Those who worked inside the home were most often domestics or cooks in other people’s households, or else did sewing, crafts, or laundry within their own homes. But Effie Munro’s daughter had tremendous advantages, so let’s consider rather further.  She had a well-traveled white mother who practically merited the term “adventuress,” one with her own money and prospects, and she had a white father pledged to love and protect her.  The family must have faced terrible social pressures, but they were strong and affluent and committed and brave.  So what might have become of her?

Marriage.  Well to do women seldom, let us remember, sought work at all.  One of the most likely lives Lucy would have found is marriage to a prosperous man of color—but remember, Effie married a black gentleman, and her new husband saw no issue with interracial marriage.  Therefore, provided the groom was suitably courageous, kind, and generally awesome, I have no problem believing Effie’s daughter could have married whomever she damn well pleased!

—Education.  Lucy came from two highly intelligent and resourceful parents, and ones with no fear of flouting social convention.  If Effie’s daughter developed an interest in the sciences or the humanities, she would most likely have used the knowledge for teaching, possibly even in a school dedicated to educating people of color.

—Small Business Ownership.  It was extremely uncommon for women to own their own businesses, but it was just barely possible.  Lucy had no need of her own income; however, if she had a love of hospitality, hats, printing, what have you, she could have owned a restaurant, millinery, or small press, for example.

The Arts.  Lucy must have experienced myriad disappointments and snobberies even growing up with such a badass parent and step-parent.  She would have a lot to express, and since money was no object, I personally like to think that she could have chosen to tell her story through music, painting, or some other medium.  This is my headcanon.

—Social Justice.  Times, they were hard in the 19th century, especially for people of color; it would come as no surprise to me if Lucy became a revolutionary, a crusader for civil rights during the early days of the suffragette movement—in fact, if she wasn’t a suffragette, I’ll eat my hat.

Whatever became of Lucy Munro, I hope she had a full and happy life.  Not only were her parents behind her, but so were Sherlock Holmes, John Watson, and Sir Arthur Conan Doyle himself—a pretty formidable cheer team if I ever saw one.

Historical studies!

edwardspoonhands:

puckish-thoughts:

THERE IT IS AGAIN!  THERE IT FUCKING IS!  i’VE BEEN TALKING ABOUT THIS PHOTO FOR YEARS AND NEVER COULD FIND IT!!  THE LAN PARTY WITH THE GUY DUCT-TAPED TO THE CEILING!!  BACK IN ANCIENT TIMES WHEN PEOPLE STILL USED CATHODE MONITORS AND WHEN COUNTERSTRIKE WAS THE NEW THING.  THIS SHIT IS REAL.  THIS IS REAL SHIT.  SHIT THAT HAPPENED.

but….but why?

edwardspoonhands:

puckish-thoughts:

THERE IT IS AGAIN!  THERE IT FUCKING IS!  i’VE BEEN TALKING ABOUT THIS PHOTO FOR YEARS AND NEVER COULD FIND IT!!  THE LAN PARTY WITH THE GUY DUCT-TAPED TO THE CEILING!!  BACK IN ANCIENT TIMES WHEN PEOPLE STILL USED CATHODE MONITORS AND WHEN COUNTERSTRIKE WAS THE NEW THING.  THIS SHIT IS REAL.  THIS IS REAL SHIT.  SHIT THAT HAPPENED.

but….but why?

Happy Birthday, Montgomery Clift! | (October 17, 1920 — July 23, 1966)
"He lived longer than either Monroe or Dean, and he had many more shadings and subtleties than some of the greatest icons—Clift’s performances are extraordinarily delicate, and he was actually able to convey the sense of a thought or an emotion forming in his characters and passing through them. Clift was one of the rare actors who could make confusion, sadness, melancholy and even depression not just interesting, but dynamic … [he] was a brilliant actor and, I think, one of the most unusual presences in the history of movies."Martin Scorsese
"He worked – he really worked hard." — Howard Hawks
"The only line I know of that’s wrong in Shakespeare is ‘Holding a mirror up to nature.’ You hold the magnifying glass up to nature. As an actor you just enlarge it enough so that your audience can identify with a situation. If it were a mirror we would have no art."Montgomery Clift
kushandwizdom:

More pictures here

kushandwizdom:

More pictures here

clit-commanderx:

faafetai64:

Amen.

oh shit

clit-commanderx:

faafetai64:

Amen.

oh shit


Hands Reading Braille (1993), photographed by Imogen Cunningham.

Hands Reading Braille (1993), photographed by Imogen Cunningham.

bethrevis:

you could kill a man in any of these dresses, and pretty sure no jury would convict you. those are killing-men dresses, that’s what i’m saying